dVerse Prosery

Sometimes

Sometimes weather flings itself in a tantrum at my feet. Such wild abandon in its reach. And sometimes I am lost in my own deep stare. Deep in the face of angry clouds that  flood my sight, deep in rain punctuating the ground with broad, cursive raindrops. Sometimes the great bones of my life feel so heavy in this lean air.


abstract of Image “The Return of the Herd” by Pieter Bruegel the Elder.

For dVerse Poets. A prose poem including the line “Sometimes the great bones of my life feel so heavy” from May Oliver’s poem “Azures” published in the book Wild Geese. Image “The Return of the Herd” by Pieter Bruegel the Elder. © Misky 2021

15 responses to “dVerse Prosery”

  1. Wow! You have packed so much emotion in this tight little gem of a prose piece, Misky! 💝💝 I loved every word 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

      1. You’re most welcome 💝

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Oh my, what a marvelous post, Misky!!!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Weather does like to fling itself about doesn’t it.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Sometimes I read something that deeply moves me. Like this time.

    -David

    Like

    1. Thank you, Ben.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. A great ekphrastic response to Bruegel’s painting. I love your opening ‘Sometimes weather flings itself in a tantrum at my feet’ I can picture that so clearly, coming from Northern climes!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. We’re supposed to be getting out and getting exercise during lockdown, but in this weather only an umbrella wants to be outside. 😂

      Liked by 2 people

      1. I totally understand and identify! ☔️

        Liked by 1 person

  6. I love your opening line too. I know it.
    Weather sometimes punctuates our mood…
    Anna :o]

    Like

  7. I’m very familiar with weather’s tantrums, but rhis morning weather chooses to splatter sunshine over my drab world and my great bones aren’t quite so heavy!

    Like

  8. A beautiful use of Ms. Oliver’s line … beautiful.

    Like

  9. Marilyn, this is a glimmering dark jewel of a prose poem! I love the metaphor of the weather tantrum and its wild abandon, and the deep stare.

    Like

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